iguanamouth:

UNUSUAL HOARD commission for psychologicalmumbojumbo hey you know whats impossible to get tired of after drawing 1000 times. not dice

  • sasuke: what i'm after... is revolution
  • naruto: well have you planned out what to do after revolution
  • sasuke: what
  • sakura: yeah, after all, it'd be reckless to believe that just knocking down the existing structures would fix everything
  • sasuke: what
  • kakashi: that's right. the economic/political structures through the various villages right now are pretty hard-wired, and to change them for the better, certainly, the first step is doing away with the old, but if you don't have any steps afterwards, you're likely looking at the same old kind of powers rising up and taking control.
  • sasuke: what
  • naruto: so if we're going to go ahead with this revolution we also need to make sure that, beyond just killing the five kages, we tear down other capitalist structures underneath their reign and replace them with a system that uses resources and abilities - of which we seem to have almost no limit to, considering our own sizable skill with jutsus that allows us to move mountains themselves, or generate massive amounts of electrical power, for just a few examples - and put them to work making sure everyone is fed, sheltered, and has what they need.
  • sasuke: what
  • sakura: which isn't to say we can just stop there. there are other oppressive structures at work, not limited to just capital and how it is used and who it is put in the hands of, but multiple axes of power in general, as brought on by how history has been structured and the narratives given to us by both those in power and society as a whole, and working to remove those should also be part of our goal.
  • sasuke: what
  • kakashi: correct. now, if you'll look at this scroll here, i've started writing some theories on how, after revolution, we can use our jutsus, both as individuals and as a collective, to keep food production intact and distribute it to absolutely everyone
  • sasuke: i just
  • sasuke: i was just thinking i'd kill the five kages
  • naruto: well that seems very short sighted of you

art-of-swords:

[ NEWS ] Scholars confirm first discovery of Japanese sword from master bladesmith Masamune in 150 years

  • by Casey Baseel

Should you visit a history museum in Japan, and, like I do, make an immediate beeline for the collections of samurai armor and weaponry, you might be surprised to notice that Japanese swords are customarily displayed with the stitching removed from the hilt. Visually, it sort of dampens the impact, since the remaining skinny slab of metal is a lot less evocative of it actually being gripped and wielded by one of Japan’s warriors of ages past.

The reason this is done, though, is because many Japanese swordsmiths would “sign” their works by etching their names into the metal of the hilt. Some craftsmen achieved almost legendary status, becoming folk heroes whose names are widely known even today.

The most respected of all, though, was Masamune, whose reluctance to sign his blades has made identifying them difficult. But difficult and impossible are two different things, and for the first time in over a century, a sword has been confirmed by historians as being the creation of the master himself.

Masamune was active during the late 13th and early 14th centuries, the part of Japan that today is part of Kanagawa Prefecture. He lived his life during the Kamakura Period, when the samurai class saw the most dramatic rise in its power over Japan.

Producing the highest-quality blades during a time of military power made Masamune’s swords extremely prized. Today, the only swordsmith who can approach his exalted historical status is Muramasa, who was born hundreds of years later. Justified or not, Muramasa is said to have been psychologically imbalanced and prone to violence. Superstition holds that these traits were passed on to the swords he forged, and as such Masamune’s are often held to be the superior weapons.

However, it can be hard to keep track of weapons in a country that’s gone through as many civil wars, revolutions, and occupations as Japan has, no matter how impressive their pedigree. Last year, a man brought a sword, which had found its way into his personal property, to the Kyoto National Museum to be appraised. Historian and sword scholar Taeko Watanabe spent the months between then and now studying the blade, and has recently announce her conclusion that it is a Masamune.

"Judging from its unique characteristics such as the pattern that can be seen in the side of the blade… it was unmistakably forged by Masamune."

The particular sword, which Watanabe says is called the Shimazu Masamune, had been given in 1862 by Iemochi, the 14th Tokugawa shogun, to the Imperial Family to mark his marriage to Princess Kazunomiya, also known as Princess Kazu.

"By presenting such a masterwork to the Imperial Family, Iemochi showed the deepest appreciation and highest respect," Watanabe commented.

Following this, the sword’s whereabouts were unknown until its anonymous owner brought it to the museum in Kyoto. It is the first blade to be confirmed as a Masamune in roughly 150 years.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Rocket News 24

  • guard: by the gods, it's true, isn't it? a dragon has attacked Whiterun. how could mere men bring down such a beast?
  • female dragonborn: [looks straight into the camera like on the office]

orphan elephant of the ivory trade Bella & abandoned puppy Bubbles are best friends [x]

(via januariat)

nezua:

nedahoyin:

america-wakiewakie:

A group of warriors from Brazil’s indigenous Ka’apor tribe tracked down illegal loggers in the Amazon, tied them up, stripped them and beat them with sticks.

Photographer Lunae Parracho followed the Ka’apor warriors during their jungle expedition to search for and expel illegal loggers from the Alto Turiacu Indian territory in the Amazon basin.

Tired of what they say is a lack of sufficient government assistance in keeping loggers off their land, the Ka’apor people, who along with four other tribes are the legal inhabitants and caretakers of the territory, have sent their warriors out to expel all loggers they find and set up monitoring camps.

Last year, the Brazilian government said that annual destruction of its Amazon rain forest jumped by 28 percent after four straight years of decline. Based on satellite images, it estimated that 5,843 square kilometres of rain forest were felled in the one-year period ending July 2013.

The Amazon rain forest is considered one of the world’s most important natural defences against global warming because of its capacity to absorb huge amounts of carbon dioxide. Rain forest clearing is responsible for about 75 percent of Brazil’s emissions, as vegetation is burned and felled trees rot. Such activity releases an estimated 400 million tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere every year, making Brazil at least the sixth-biggest emitter of carbon dioxide gas.

(Photo Credit: Lunae Parracho/Reuters)

WELP..

Indigenous resistance.

(via mysoulhasgrowndeep-liketherivers)

atane:

2 white construction workers who were witnesses to Mike Brown’s murder have stepped forward to say that Mike Brown was murdered with his hands up. They fear losing their jobs.

(via mysoulhasgrowndeep-liketherivers)

thecomicsvault:

Radditz vs. Krillin
By Akira Toriyama

(via darthjader)

littlealienproducts:

mass migration of sting rays
“It never fails to astonish me that the same conservatives who argue that every last aspect of big government is irreparably broken and corrupt inevitably see a capital punishment system that is perfect and just. If you genuinely believe that the state can’t even fix a pothole without self-dealing and corruption, how is it possible to imagine that police departments and prosecutors’ offices are beyond suspicion, even though they are subject to immeasurable political pressure to wrap up cases, even when the evidence is shaky and ill-gotten, and even as there are other avenues that have gone unexplored?”
— Dahlia Lithwick, via Lawyers, Guns and Money (via politicalprof)

Someone in a thread over at the Pathfinder RPG pafe said said “These personal issues really distracts from the game. Does anyone remember the days when none of this stuff was a friggin issue and all we had was fun????”

Such a time never existed, and if you think it does it’s because either as a guy you never had to deal with it, or for some reason your experiences were sheltered.

You know what days *I* remember?

I remember being told no matter how well I rolled, my female D&D fighter could not, as a matter of the *rules* be as strong as a man. Another player could decide his 13-year-old boy PC had a 18/00 Strength because he was magically blessed, but as a female character I *couldn’t*.

I remember bringing in a new character and being told they’d pick me up at the next village, and my background would be randomly rolled for. And do you know what was rolled? Harlot. And then I had to see what KIND of harlot. But, I was assured, this was totally fair. Because I might end up being a pimp, which would mean I was a male character.

But no, I was a wanton wench.

I remember not being ABLE to find a figure for a female warrior who didn’t have her tits, ass, thighs, or all of the above exposed. I remember being shown an editorial in Dragon Magazine where Kim Mohan *admitted* that sexualization in female miniatures was a problem, but claimed the Strength cap wasn’t “something any reasonable person could argue with” … AND didn’t offer any suggestions on how to deal with either issue.

I remember being told that since my magic-user’s level title for the next level was “sorcerer,” and not “sorceress,” and there was NO evidence in the rules of female sorcerers, I could NOT gain that level.

These were the people who TAUGHT me to role-play. And yeah that last argument is stupid, but I had NO WAY of knowing that. I mean there were racial caps for classes, and a Strength cap for gender, so why wouldn’t I accept a gender cap for classes?

Those days sucked. Roleplaying was so great a thrill I wanted to do it anyway. It wasn’t until one of the toads I played with physically assaulted me I left that group, because I was young and impressionable and they had LOTS of evidence that was just How the Game Was Played.

Never, EVER think that HOW a company describes things, presents itself, covers issue of gender and sexual orientation in the rules, and comports itself with customers doesn’t have a MAJOR impact on the culture of people playing the game.

TSR, and then WotC, had a LONG history of showing that women are second-class PCs at best, and mostly exist as sex objects to cling to the thighs of Conan-like heroes. Played by Boys. Gary Gygaz once said that women’s Brains are “Wired Differently,” and that’s why they just aren’t interested in rpgs. Of course that attitude impacted how woman were portrayed, and thus how a lot of players and DMs played.

It’s NOT that “All Cheesecake is Bad.” I’m not claiming you can’t have sexy character and nods to pulp – you just have to have them for both genders, and you have to have more than that. You have to show a RANGE of characters, male and female, spellcaster and warrior, preferable in every product but absolutely in the core rules.

Paizo and Pathfinder do a MUCH better job of that than anything WotC did before 5e (and 5e is too new to fairly judge either way). And so yeah, it is NO surprise to me when I can have fun with every Pathfinder group I ever meet, and get inappropriately harassed by about a third of the MTG and D&D groups I encounter.

So yeah, this stuff matters. It has ALWAYS mattered. And we NEED it in order to allow EVERYONE to “all have fun.”

Dungeon Dames (via adventuresinozrpg)

The Magic community can be a cesspool.

(via blue-author)

eanissleepy:

Arashiyama & Sagano Bamboo Forest

Arashiyama has this bridge called Togetsukuyo Bridge.

The Togetsukyo Bridge (lit. “Moon Crossing Bridge”) is Arashiyama’s most iconic landmark. It was originally built during the Heian Period(794-1185) and most recently reconstructed in the 1930s. The bridge looks particularly attractive in combination with the forested mountainside in the background. A riverside park with dozens of cherry trees is located just adjacent to the bridge. - Source: Japan-guide.com

So we biked passed the bridge to head to Sagano Bamboo Forest. The entrance to the place was just confusing…! But anyway, we found our way in. Unfortunately, the lighting that time wasn’t so good so I didn’t take much nice pictures. I got one that looks like a classical Japan moment (1st photo). The bamboo forest is a nice place to take stroll and unwind from the bustling Kyoto city.

Photos by Ean Dacay (me)

Did you go at 4am or something? When I walked through the bamboo forest there was a huge throng of people along with me.